If You Give a Mom an Hour

February 6, 2012

Completely different from my usually fare, but enjoy my latest offering.

Brief, but if you are a Mom, you can probably relate.

 

If You Give a Mom an Hour

If Dad takes the kids to the park and you give a Mom an hour…

She’s going to want a cup of tea.

She’ll turn on the tea kettle and reach for a mug in the cabinet.

Except, there won’t be any mugs.

So she’ll open the dishwasher that is full of clean dishes, because her daughter (whose chore it is to unload) hasn’t gotten around to emptying it yet.

She’ll pull out the mug, and then spot the dirty dishes in the sink, and decide to empty and reload the dishwasher.

When she’s done, she’ll go to sit down to wait for the kettle, and as she walks to the table, her foot will crunch on a Cheerio.

She’ll grab the broom from the laundry room and sweep the kitchen floor.

As she empties the dustpan into the garbage, she’ll notice that it’s pretty full, and she’ll take it out to the trash bins.

As she walks back into the house, she’ll notice a tricycle, left in a corner of the driveway.

When she wheels it back to it’s spot in the garage, she’ll find her 5 year old’s baseball cap.

She’ll pick it up and take it inside, and up to his room, tripping on a toy on the stairs.

After dropping off the hat, she’ll pick up the toy and take it to the basement, discovering the empty popcorn bowl from the night before.

As she brings the bowl to the kitchen, she’ll turn off the kettle, knowing it’s about to whistle, will grab a tea bag, and will pour the hot water into her mug.

She’ll know it’s too hot to drink, so she’ll turn to the pantry to find something to nibble on with her tea and will find an empty box of 100 Calorie snack packs.

She’ll break down the cardboard and will notice two empty cereal boxes on the counter, so she’ll break those down, too.

As she carries them to the laundry room, where the cardboard is kept, the dryer will buzz, and she’ll pull out the clothes and hang them, quickly, before they wrinkle.

Then, she’ll move the clothes from the washer into the dryer and realize she forgot to get the basket of dirty clothes from her room.

So, she’ll trudge back upstairs and head to her bedroom.

As she grabs the laundry basket, she’ll notice that someone probably crawled into her bed to watch television and she needs to remake the bed.

While she’s making the bed, she’ll step on an empty inhaler that she probably dropped there, in the night, after using it.

She’ll look in her nightstand to see if she has another, and when she realizes she doesn’t, she’ll quickly call the pharmacy to renew the prescription.

When she hangs up the phone, she’ll see her iPad and remember that she was in the middle of a good part in her book (on the Nook) when she fell asleep last night, so she’ll put the iPad on top of the laundry in the basket and bring it downstairs with her.

She’ll load up the washer, pick up the iPad, and walk back to the counter.

Her tea will be just the right temperature for drinking, so she’ll take the iPad and the tea to the living room, and as she sinks into the comfy couch, the front door will open.

“Mom!  We’re home!”

Advertisements

Writing

June 10, 2011

I’ve been writing like a fiend, lately.

I just spent three months on maternity leave, with my fourth child, and found my creative juices to be unstoppable.

I think it is safe to say that my children, are indeed, my muses.

Which may seem strange, considering the subject matter of The Follow Through, however, with children, all things are fantastical and imagined.  It moves my own imagination and reminds me that, in your mind, anything is possible.

I’ve also begun the process, once again, of trying to market my novel.

I feel as though The Follow Through is calling out and begging to be read, and so I revisit the process of looking for representation, in the hopes that someone else will agree that this is a story worthy of being read by others.


Hint Fiction Contest

July 18, 2009

http://www.robertswartwood.com/?page_id=8

I am finding this fascinating…

Hint fiction…telling a story in 25 words or less.  Robert Swartwood, the owner of the site to which I’ve place a link above, is creating an anthology of hint fiction.  I’m intrigued.  If you go to the site and look at the winners of his hint fiction contest, you can see that sometimes you can really pack a punch with just a few words.  The winners were fabulous, and I can’t wait to read more.